Malware Monday made simple: thousands could lose their internet

Malware Monday made simple: thousands could lose their internet »Play Video

EUGENE, Ore. --   Tens of thousands of Americans may lose their internet on Monday, and it's a problem the FBI has gotten involved with. 

The problem is all caused by malware, or malicious software, created by hackers to access personal information like credit card numbers. The FBI has been working to get rid of it. However FBI officials said they think about 64,000 computers in the U.S. have malware.

The malware that the FBI is targeting is called a DNS Changer. If your computer is infected  with it -- you will likely lose access to the web on Monday.

"They want you to go to the places you normally go because they want you to give out your information, your credit card ... all that information they can track and you can see it as you do it," said Josh Garnick.

Garnick works for the computer repair company Nerds on Call. He fixed a computer last month infected by this particular virus. "It spreads and infects people as youre doing your normal routine but you're infecting other people just by being online."

In November, the FBI created temporary servers specified for those infected by these viruses. It's like a quarantine, and those using the temporary server may may not know they are infected. The FBI found this was the best way to contain the spread of DNS changer.

"The FBI to my knowledge doesn't typically get involved to this level because it is so because it's a big deal..the way it perpetuates," said Garnick.

But on Monday, the FBI will be shutting down the servers, and those with the virus won't be able to access the internet.

There's a way to see if you have the virus, and it only takes a few seconds to check online. If you visit the website: dns-ok.us/ and the screen turns green, your computer does not have the malware.

If it's red, then your computer has the malware. That means you'll have to get rid of it by yourself or get someone to help you. The website brought in by the FBI also has some tips to help with the removal process.

Garnick advises people to use a trusty anti-virus software that is up to date. For everything you may need to know about the DNS Changer malware go to the webpage sponsored by the FBI: http://www.dcwg.org/